121 Report – CRMA – April 2016

April 18, 2016          

In This Issue:

Council and County Legislative Activity

CITY COUNCIL AND COOK COUNTY ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS

INTRODUCTIONS

 

Chicago Paid Sick Leave

Sponsors:  Alderman Toni Foulkes (15th Ward), Alderman Ameya Pawar (47th Ward), Alderman Joe Moreno
Committee:  Workforce Development and Audit

Almost a year after their first meeting, Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s Working Families Working Group (WFWG) issued a report that recommended the Chicago City Council pass an employer-funded paid sick leave ordinance.  This proposal closely follows that recommendation.  IRMA participated in the WFWG and, along with the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce, opposed the recommendation that forces yet another unfunded mandate in a long list of mandates that the City Council has passed in the last two years.  There are many models available to address Paid Sick Leave.  It can be employer funded in whole or in part, it can be paid for through a social insurance program set up by the jurisdiction, and it can be paid for by the employer at a rate of less than 100%.  Without equal consideration of all options, the WFWG chose a wholly employer-funded mandate and the sponsors concurred.

Here are the main points of the proposal in Q & A form:

Who is covered?

Any employee that works at least 80 hours within a 120 day period and is at least 18 years of age.  Current collective bargaining agreements are exempt.  Future collective bargaining agreements must specifically exempt themselves from this law.

What type of leave must the employer provide?

The employer must provide either paid sick leave (PSL) or paid time off (PTO).  If the employer chooses to provide PSL, then the employee will be allowed to take the time to care for a) her/his own illness or medical care related to an illness/injury or case of domestic violence,b) the illness of a family member or c) cases of business or school shut down due to a public health emergency.  If the employer chooses to provide PTO, then the employee can take any eligible time earned for any reason.

How does PSL/PTO accrue?

The employer can give the employee 5 days upfront for the year (a year is calculated from the employee’s first day of work) or the effective date of the ordinance, whichever is later.  Or, the employer can choose to use an accrual system instead.  If so, then the employee will accrue PSL at the rate of 1 hour for every 40 hours worked.  The maximum number of hours an Employee can take will not exceed 40 hours of PSL per 12-month period.

Will an employee be allowed to carry over PSL/PTO?

Yes.  An employee can carry over a maximum of 20 hours to the following 12-month period.  However, if an employee works for an employer that must comply with FMLA, then the employee will be allowed to carryover up to 40 hours of PSL to use concurrently with FMLA and up to 20 hours of PSL accrued if eligible.

Will employers be required to pay out any PSL/PTO upon employee separation?  Will employers be required to pay out PSL/PTO at the end of an employee’s 12-month period?

No.  Employers will not be required to pay out any unused PSL/PTO.

How will this ordinance apply to tipped employees?

An employer must pay the tipped employee at the full minimum wage in effect at the time the employee takes leave.

How many days in a row can an employee take of PSL?

The employee can take as many days as have accrued up to 40 hours, but the proposal does specifically allow an employer to require documentation when an employee takes more than three consecutive days of PSL.

What kind of notice must I provide to my employees?

You must amend or replace the minimum wage sign to include notice of rights to PSL/PTO.

What recourse does an employee have if I fail to provide PSL/PTO?

The employee has a private right of action in the appropriate court of jurisdiction.  A fine can also be issued by the city for each violation at a rate of $500-$1000 for each violation.

If the proposal passes, when will it become effective?

July 1, 2017

Chicago Increased Gas Tax

Sponsor:  Alderman Gilbert Villegas

Committee:  Budget and Government Operations

Citing deteriorating roads in the city and the low price for gas, this proposal attempts to increase Chicago’s gas tax from the current $0.05/gallon to $0.12/gallon in order to pay for roads, bridges and other transportation infrastructure.  The additional $0.07/gallon would be sent to a special fund dedicated to pay for repairs and not to the Corporate Fund to be incorporated into general revenue.  There are a number of attempts by various levels of government to increase the gas tax.  Cook County’s $0.04/gallon increase is detailed below, and there is an effort at the state level to tax drivers at 1.5 cents for every mile driven.  On the heels of the city’s latest tobacco tax that disproportionately affects gas stations, CRMA is opposed to an increase in the gas tax.

Cook County Increased Gas Tax

Sponsor:  Commissioner Richard R. Boykin (1st District)

Committee:  Finance

This week, Commissioner Richard R. Boykin introduced the Community Stabilization & Anti-Violence Act of Cook County.  The proposal would add an additional $0.04/gallon to the county’s gas tax to be used specifically for the purpose of addressing anti-violence initiatives in the County.  Gas is currently taxed in the County at $0.06/gallon.  The funds from the tax, which the Commissioner estimates will bring in an additional $50 million in revenues, would be split between four different funds, three of which are new initiatives.  If the price of gas were to reach $5.00/gallon for 30 days, the additional tax would expire.

(a)   Cook County Jobs Council

This is a new council made up of 5 County Commissioners, the Board President, and three agency directors.   The Council would be tasked with identifying where unemployment is greatest (at least 10% unemployment) amongst residents between the ages of 16-24 and partner with private sector employers to employ more unskilled labor in the designated areas.  The pool of workers would also be pegged to work on highway and infrastructure projects.  The Council would also provide job training and hire additional staff to manage the program from the fund.

(b)  Cook County Parenting to Prevent Violence Initiative

This program would be administered by the Justice Advisory Council who would give grants to non-profit organizations that have parenting education programs.  At least $2 million annually will be given out annually for these programs.

(c)    Office for People with Disabilities

Creates a new office within the County to address the needs of people with disabilities in the County.  The office will commence studies, conduct research, issue publications and recommendations to further its mission.  The office would be appropriated a little over $1 million annually.

(d)   Cook County Community Policing Initiative

This initiative would be overseen by the Cook County Sheriff’s office and would hire an additional 15 Sheriff’s officers to police areas of the county with high crime rates.  At least $2 million annually would be expended on this effort.

Cook County Home Rule Tax Clean-Up

Sponsor:  Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle

Committee:  Finance

This ordinance is a clean-up ordinance initiated by the Department of Revenue to ensure the Cook County Code reflects current industry practices for certain taxes and revenue items and that compliance and payment efforts are uniform and standardized.  All changes are revenue neutral.

The next City Council meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, May 18 2016.

The next County Board meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, May 11, 2016.

TanyaTriche

 Tanya Triche

Vice President /General Counsel

312-726-4600

ttriche@irma.org

121 Report – CRMA – March 2016

In This Issue

CHICAGO PENSION UPDATE
COUNCIL AND COUNTY LEGISLATIVE ACTIVITY

CHICAGO PENSION REFORM EFFORT DENIED BY
IL SUPREME COURT

Last week, the Illinois Supreme Court decided that the city’s proposed fix to its pension problems was unconstitutional, sending the city back to the drawing board to find a solution. This outcome was not a surprise. The city’s bill was very similar to a state proposed pension fix that was denied by the IL Supreme Court last year.

In relevant part, the city’s bill proposed changes to the pension provisions of the Municipal Laborers Union fund as well as the Municipal Employees’ Union fund. The proposed changes would have recalculated how increases to benefits for retirees were determined which would have reduced the level of increases over time and would have required employees to contribute more to their pensions. On the other hand, it would have increased the city’s contributions to the pension funds over time. This is significant because with the city’s current rate of pay into the funds, the funds would have been depleted over time leaving many pensioners without their retirement plan.

The city hoped that its pension law would withstand a constitutional challenge as it claimed that the proposal did not diminish or impair rights guaranteed to each union member. It staked its claim on the fact that the city was now taking on the responsibility of paying out the benefits and becoming liable for the viability of the funds instead of just guaranteeing payment. This, the city argued, actually bestowed a net benefit on beneficiaries even considering the changes that diminished some benefits. In addition, the city claimed that the unions approved the new deal in an arms-length negotiation through a fair bargaining process.

The court ruled that pension contracts can indeed be altered and additional benefits conferred if there is bargained-for consideration that doesn’t involuntarily diminish benefits. The problem with the city’s bill was that it absolutely diminished benefits which the pension protection clause prohibits. Even in a case where the city clearly was not in a position to make the pension funds whole, and the funds were due to become insolvent in the next 10 years, that financial situation, however dire, does not allow the General Assembly to respond by reducing benefits to save the funds. Moreover, the court found that the there was not language sufficient in the Act to have the city act as a guarantor for the funds. Therefore, the promise could not be considered an overall benefit that offsets a diminishing other benefits.

With the IL Supreme Court decision in hand, the city has joined the state in the very difficult task of trying to find a fix that the court will find constitutional. We will keep members informed of how this situation may impact the bottom line of business owners as the city struggles to find the revenue to keep the pension funds from becoming insolvent.

CITY COUNCIL AND COOK COUNTY
ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS

INTRODUCTIONS

Hearing to Track the Success of Redevelopment Agreements and Enterprise Zones

Sponsor: Alderman Edward M. Burke (14th Ward)

Committee: Finance

Mondelez announced last year that it would be closing its factory on the south side of the city and eliminating 600 jobs. It also announced that it would add jobs to its facility in Salinas, Mexico. Since Mondelez received a favorable redevelopment agreement from the city in 1994 to modernize its south side manufacturing plant, the council is interested in viewing reports related to compliance with the terms of this agreement and all such agreements for companies located within an Enterprise Zone. In particular, the Council is interested in knowing how much companies have received in tax breaks and other financial incentives, and how many jobs were created or retained as a result of the agreement. The resolution calls on the Department of Planning and Development as well as the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity to testify to the details and/or success of these programs in attracting or retaining jobs.

PASSED INITIATIVES

 

CHICAGO

Mayor Emanuel’s Tobacco Tax and Regulation Package

Sponsors: Mayor Rahm Emanuel, Alderman Proco Joe Moreno (1st Ward) and Alderman Ameya Pawar (47th Ward)

This item considered again after being deferred on the Council floor at the February meeting.

Yet another substitute was introduced and passed all at the same meeting. Since there were several versions considered throughout this process, we want to make sure that tobacco retailers understand what passed and when the changes will take effect.

  1. The Age to Purchase Will Increase to 21

The only change here is that a seller must be at least 18 years old.

  1. Chicago will now tax other tobacco products (OTP)

While the concern was raised that Chicago may not have the authority to implement its own OTP tax, the City Council decided to move forward with this portion of the ordinance. The rates for taxing OTP are as follows:

 Smoking Tobacco:  $1.80/oz

Smokeless Tobacco:  $1.80/oz

Little Cigars:  $0.20/unit

Large Cigars:  $0.20/unit

Pipe Tobacco: $0.60/oz

The ordinance then goes on to say that if the OTP tax is challenged in an appropriate court of law and found unlawful, then 90 days after the last court challenge the city will implement minimum floor pricing on tobacco products and packaging regulations for little cigars. Those items will be regulated as follows:

  1. Minimum Floor Pricing

Cigarettes and Little Cigars:  $11.50/pack

Large Cigars:  $1.36/cigar

Smoking Tobacco:  $11.29/oz

Smokeless Tobacco: $4.94/oz

Pipe Tobacco: $4.56/oz

  1. Packaging Regulations

All tobacco products must be sold in original packaging.  Little Cigars must be sold in packages of at least 10 units.

  1. Ban on Coupons and Discounts

Coupons and other discounts on tobacco products will be prohibited.

Fines for violations of the provisions of these sections have increased tremendously. If a person commits at least two violations of selling tobacco products outside of their original packaging within a 48-month period, then the license can be revoked. If the licensee violates any of the other tobacco sections three times within a 48-month period, then the licensee may have not be able to renew the license.

 

Eliminating the Tax on Feminine Hygiene Products

Sponsors: Alderman Edward M. Burke (14th Ward), Alderman Leslie Hairston (5th Ward) and City Clerk Susana Mendoza

Beginning January 1, 2017, the ordinance would eliminate the city’s portion of the sales tax (1.25%) on feminine hygiene products. It will re-categorize the products as medical appliances. The sponsors argue that such products were defined in relevant case law as “medical appliances” and should therefore be taxed similarly. In IL statute, medical appliances are taxed at the low rate (1%), but since the city cannot re-categorize these products for the state, it will just eliminate its portion of the tax.

Feminine hygiene products are currently categorized as “grooming and hygiene” products for the purpose of state taxation. This change was made as part of the state’s attempt to streamline its sales tax, so that the way Illinois taxes products is uniform with how such products are taxed in the majority of states. A bill was recently introduced in the Illinois Senate to exempt these products, along with incontinence products, from state tax. Upon IRMA’s request, the sponsor agreed to move the immediate effective date to January 1, 2017. This was done in order to give the state time to either lower or eliminate the tax on these products during the legislative session so that the tax is uniform.

Members with stores elsewhere in Cook County should note that the Board also passed a similar measure sponsored by Commissioner Richard Boykin, but instead of reclassifying the products, it simply removed them from taxation (1.75%). It also pushed its effective date back upon IRMA’s request. Both local laws will take effect on January 1, 2017.

 

Ban on the Use of Smokeless Tobacco at Professional Sporting Events

Sponsors: Alderman Edward M. Burke (14th Ward) and 7 co-sponsors

This ban was introduced directly into the Finance Committee which heard testimony from various health professionals, as well as US Sen. Dick Durbin, who has been pushing this issue in Congress. Citing several cities that have passed similar measures, Sen. Durbin urged for Chicago to pass the ordinance so that children wouldn’t be attracted to the product after seeing their favorite baseball player chew tobacco. The ban will take effect during the middle of the regular season for Major League Baseball.

Effective Date: June 11, 2016

 

COOK COUNTY

New Crane Operator Licensing and Exam

Sponsor: Commissioner Bridget Gainer (10th District)

Following a similar measure passed in Chicago in 2013, this ordinance will require any person that operates a crane or boom truck to take an exam and become licensed by the County. Applicants will have to register, although applicants that are already licensed by the city of Chicago or any other municipality in the county will not have to apply for the license.

Effective Date: December 1, 2016

Return to Top

TanyaTriche

Contact Information:

Tanya Triche
Vice President/General Counsel
ttriche@irma.org
312-726-4600

121 Report – CRMA – February 2016

In This Issue

City Council Activity

CITY COUNCIL ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS

 

INTRODUCTIONS

 

Proposal to Enact New Taxes and Regulations on the Sale of Tobacco Products

Sponsors:  Mayor Rahm Emanuel, Alderman Proco Joe Moreno (1st Ward), Alderman Will Burns (4th Ward) and Alderman Ameya Pawar (47th Ward)

This item passed out of committee, but was deferred on the Council floor

A substitute proposal was introduced into committee that made some interesting changes.  First the Mayor kept the ban on the sale of tobacco products to persons under the age of 21 as well as the OTP tax.  In addition, he added “invalidation” language which basically said that if the OTP tax was rendered invalid by the courts, then the minimum floor pricing (MFP), coupon/discount prohibition and packaging restrictions would become effective.  If the OTP tax was upheld, or maybe even never challenged, then there would be no MFP or packaging regulations.  The possession offense by minors was also deleted.

After a contentious committee hearing on the proposal which, in our opinion, made no substantive changes, the matter was not called for a vote and held for one day in order for the Mayor’s office to make changes to address concerns expressed by the Aldermen.  The Aldermen were concerned mostly about how an aggressive tax and ban policy on cigarettes has created a thriving market for the illegal sale of cigarettes whether by organized street gangs, entrepreneurial spirits driving across the border and selling on the street, or rogue retailers.  Another proposal to increase taxes, prices and regulations on tobacco would only add to the problem.

At the next committee hearing, which took place less than 48 hours after the first hearing, a second substitute proposal was introduced.  The language was basically unchanged from the first substitute with the addition of new enforcement provisions and department reporting requirements to tackle the illegal cigarette sale issue.  The proposal moved out of committee with a vote of 22-8.  When it was addressed at the city council meeting, five Aldermen (Ervin, Garza, Hairston, Reilly and Sposato) moved to defer the vote until the next meeting of the City Council which, as of this writing, meets on Wednesday, March 16, 2016.

As a reminder, here is a breakdown of the proposed taxes, minimum floor prices and packaging regulations:

Other Tobacco Products Tax

State law prohibits the city from taxing OTP.  It seems that, with this proposal, the city is welcoming a legal challenge to its authority.  It is our reading that state law grants that authority only to home rule jurisdictions that passed their own law prior to July 1st, 1993.  The OTP tax would be set according to the following rates:

Smoking Tobacco:  $6.60/oz

Smokeless Tobacco:  $1.80/oz

Little Cigars:  $0.15/unit

Large Cigars:  $0.90/unit

Minimum Floor Pricing

The sponsors are concerned that the “youth” are being enticed to purchase tobacco products and that the full effect of the tax is not being felt by this population.  They want to keep the price of tobacco products high as a discouragement to the “youth” from purchasing the products.  The MFP would be set at the following rates:

Cigarettes and Little Cigars:  $11.50/pack

Large Cigars:  $1.74/cigar

Smoking Tobacco:  $11.50 per 0.65oz ($17.70/oz)

Smokeless Tobacco: $4.00/oz

Packaging Regulations

All tobacco products must be sold in original packaging.  Cigars can only be sold in packages of four units unless each individual cigar has a listed price of more than $3.00.  Little Cigars must be sold in packages of at least 20 units.

Proposal to Eliminate the Tax on Feminine Hygiene Products

Sponsors:  Alderman Edward M. Burke (14th Ward), Alderman Leslie Hairston (5th Ward) and City Clerk Susana Mendoza

Committee:  Finance

This proposal would remove the city portion of the tax (1.25%) on feminine hygiene products.  The sponsors argue that such products were defined in relevant case law as “medical appliances” and therefore exempt from both city and state sales taxes.

Feminine hygiene products are currently categorized as “grooming and hygiene” products for the purpose of state taxation.  This change was made as part of the state’s attempt to streamline its sales tax, so that the way Illinois taxes products is uniform with how such products are taxed in the majority of states.  A bill was recently introduced in the Illinois Senate to exempt these products, along with incontinence products, from state tax.  It is our understanding that state law prohibits the city from removing individual products from its taxing authority that are not already removed under state law.  So the state bill would have to be passed before Chicago could have the authority to eliminate its tax.

Legacy Business Program

Sponsor:  Alderman Brian Hopkins (2nd Ward) and 9 co-sponsors

Committee:  Finance

This proposal would allow a business that was founded or is currently headquartered in Chicago, and that has had a location in the city for at least 30 years, to apply to become a legacy business.  Businesses that have been in Chicago for at least 20 years can apply as well if the business has contributed to the history of its neighborhood and if it can prove that, without being included in the Registry, it would face a significant risk of displacement.  The advantage to becoming a legacy business is that property taxes will be frozen for the business and its tenants.  The downside is that the tax burden will shift to other businesses. In order to help pay for the program, the business will pay a one-time fee of $50 and business license fees will be increased across the board for the overwhelming majority of license holders.  The proposal is modeled after a recently passed ballot initiative in San Francisco.

Nuisance Business and Chronic Illegal Activities

Sponsor:  Alderman Matt O’Shea (19th Ward) and Alderman Margaret Laurino (39th Ward)

Committee:  Public Safety

This proposal deletes several sections of the Code that pertain to illegal activity occurring inside or adjacent to a business.  The provisions being deleted will not have an effect on current operations of the department to conduct inspections, or negotiate plans of operation, voluntary closures and/or fines.  The sections of the Code that the department uses to enforce the nuisance law will remain in tact.

PASSED INITIATIVES

 

Addition of Grease Containers to Commercial Refuse Container ID Law

Sponsor:  Alderman Brendan Reilly (42nd Ward)

This ordinance will require grease containers to have the same kind of label required of commercial refuse containers. The label contains ownership identification information for the purposes of ticketing.

EFFECTIVE DATE:  March 15, 2016

TanyaTriche

Tanya Triche
Vice President/General Counsel
312-726-4600
ttriche@irma.org

121 Report – CRMA – January 2016

In This Issue

City Council Activity

CITY COUNCIL ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS

INTRODUCTIONS

 

Proposal to Enact New Taxes and Regulations on the Sale of Tobacco Products

Sponsors:  Mayor Rahm Emanuel, Alderman Proco Joe Moreno (1st Ward), Alderman Will Burns (4th Ward) and Alderman Ameya Pawar (47th Ward)

Committee on Finance

This introduction is a sweeping proposal that would tax other tobacco products (OTP), establish minimum floor pricing (MFP) for all tobacco products, raise the age of purchase (AOP) to 21 years old (up from the current 18 years), ban coupons and other discounts on tobacco products and restrict how certain tobacco products are packaged.  New York City passed a similar set of laws in 2013 which became effective in 2014.  For those of you with locations in New York City, you know all too well that New York has the highest number of illegal sales of cigarettes in the country.  Following their lead will indeed create more problems for Chicago police and a number of neighborhoods where the illegal sales of tobacco products continue to reach new heights as more product is trafficked and sold by local street gangs.  While Chicago’s problems with illegal sales haven’t reached New York’s heights, the high tax rate, compared to the much lower tax rates of surrounding states, has positioned the underground market for tobacco sales to flourish.  The proposal addresses four issue areas which are detailed below:

Other Tobacco Products Tax

State law prohibits the city from taxing OTP.  It seems that, with this proposal, the city is welcoming a legal challenge to its authority.  It is our reading that state law grants that authority only to home rule jurisdictions that passed their own law prior to July 1st, 1993.  The OTP tax would be set according to the following rates:

Smoking Tobacco:  $6.60/oz

Smokeless Tobacco:  $1.80/oz

Little Cigars:  $0.15/unit

Large Cigars:  $0.90/unit

Minimum Floor Pricing

The sponsors are concerned that the “youth” are being enticed to purchase tobacco products and that the full effect of the tax is not being felt by this population.  They want to keep the price of tobacco products high as a discouragement to the “youth” from purchasing the products.  The MFP would be set at the following rates:

Cigarettes and Little Cigars:  $11.50/pack

Large Cigars:  $1.74/cigar

Smoking Tobacco:  $11.50 per 0.65oz ($17.70/oz)

Smokeless Tobacco: $4.00/oz

Discounting

Bans any and all discounts on tobacco products.

Packaging Regulations

All tobacco products must be sold in original packaging.  Cigars can only be sold in packages of four units unless each individual cigar has a listed price of more than $3.00.  Little Cigars must be sold in packages of at least 20 units.

PASSED INITIATIVES

Curbside Cafe Permits  

Sponsor:  Alderman Tom Tunney (44th Ward)

This ordinance establishes a two-year pilot program that authorizes restaurants that do not already have a sidewalk café permit to apply for a permit that would allow them to place outside seating in the parking lane immediately in front of the establishment.  Curbside cafes would not be allowed in the Central Business District or near Wrigley Field, along with other restrictions.  Applicants must have insurance, pay a permit fee of $600 and have restricted hours of operation.  There are a number of other operational requirements.

This ordinance will allow restaurants and other retail food establishments that generally do not have an appropriate outside space for a sidewalk café to still be able to reap the benefits of Chicago’s active outdoor eating season.  CRMA members interested in applying for a permit should contact the Department of Business Affairs and Consumer Protection for more information.

EFFECTIVE DATE:  Immediately upon passage

TanyaTriche

 

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Tanya Triche
Vice President/General Counsel
312-726-4600
ttriche@irma.org

121 Report – CRMA – December 2015

December 15, 2015   

In This Issue

Chicago Rules and Regulations

Council Activity

CHICAGO DEBUTS WEBSITE FOR RULES AND REGULATIONS

While Chicago has a robust Municipal Code listing all of its various ordinances regulating business and government activity, it also has a series of Rules and Regulations addressing a number of ordinances. CRMA members know that these Rules and Regulations, when published, have the force of law and are just as important as the underlying ordinance from which they originate. To that end, for many years Chicago’s larger business community has often been unaware of these Rules and Regulations since, before today, they have never all been located in one place. In an attempt to increase transparency, the city has dedicated an area, on the Department of Law’s website, where businesses can now access all published Rules and Regulations.

CRMA encourages members to become familiar with this website and all Rules and Regulations that affect your business.

 CITY COUNCIL ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS

INTRODUCTIONS
 

Amendment to Plastic Bag Ordinance

Sponsors: Aldermen Patrick O’Connor (40th Ward) and Joe Moreno (1st Ward)

Committee on Health and Environmental Protection

This amendment defines an oxo-biodegradable bag and exempts such bags from the bag ban.
 

Regulation of Grease Containers

Sponsor: Alderman Brendan Reilly (42nd Ward)


Committee on License and Consumer Protection 

This proposal will require grease containers to be labeled similarly to commercial refuse containers with ownership information printed on the container.  The container must also include some form of technology that allows the department to scan or otherwise electronically access the labeled information.

Resolution for the US DOJ to Require State and Local Governments to Increase Regulations of Firearms Dealers

Sponsor: Alderman George Cardenas (12th Ward)

Committee on Public Safety

This resolution calls on the US Department of Justice to require states to increase regulation of gun dealers noting that improvements in standards are needed nationwide. The resolution also claims that state law enforcement programs have the effect of discriminating against sellers and purchasers based on race.

PASSED INITIATIVES
 

Asbestos Abatement in Demolition of Buildings

Sponsor: Mayor Rahm Emanuel

This ordinance requires email addresses to be included in notices to the department of demolition or asbestos abatements. These documents require attestation, and additional notifications are also required for asbestos removal.

EFFECTIVE DATE: January 12, 2016
 

Various Amendments to Laws that Affect Tobacco and Businesses that Have SNAP Contracts

Sponsor: Mayor Rahm Emanuel

This ordinance doubles all fines related to selling unstamped or improperly stamped cigarettes. In addition, it allows for any license controlled by the city to be revoked, suspended or denied if the applicant was disqualified from participating in the SNAP program.

EFFECTIVE DATE: January 22, 2016

Contact Information

TanyaTricheTanya Triche
Vice President & General Counsel
312/726-4600
ttriche@irma.org